what I post in.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from esperincantations  50 notes
I've met a draenei RPer on my server that insists the draenei were kept in cryostasis all their time aboard Genedar. I think his reference was the Quest: The Cryo-Core. I would like to disagree with that notion my self, but what are your thoughts?
Anonymous

esperincantations:

isei-silva:

buran:

isei-silva:

Cryo-pods are canon, and draenei did use them during their interstellar travels. However, I don’t think, or know, that an entire ship was ever used just for carrying cryo-pods. I would think each ship had a section for cryo-stasis for the draenei, but that they would take turns and rotate since while the ships were impressive they were not fully automatic and needed pilots and crewmen, and probably these workers wanted their families with them, to stay together, and so you’d have small communities of “awake” draenei while the rest would sleep in pods for an X amount of time, then they’d switch around. 

I mean, that’s what I think! It’s the way that makes sense to me. That way you can play a draenei that was awake during the travels, or a draenei that was in cryo-stasis, or switched around!

There are several reasons why passengers on a long-term space voyage would be kept in stasis or some other form of suspended animation.

While as far as we know the Genedar and Exodar and other Naaru ships were warp ships that didn’t have to physically transit through the space between their origin and destination points, it is likely that there were long periods of time spent in space all the same. We can surmise this from the simple fact that suspended animation was necessary at all.

Manned spaceflight is very expensive for several reasons. First, each component of a ship that carries people must be designed in such a way that its failure will not endanger the safety of the crew or it must have several backups. This directly leads to increased financial cost due to the very stringent human rating requirements. This is not likely a factor in this particular discussion, but it is one that I point out just for general information purposes.

Secondly, a crew needs several things just to survive: a breathable atmosphere, water to drink, food to eat, and a way to remove exhaled waste gas and other wastes from their environment. Current space missions are short enough that all of the food needed for the trip will be stowed on board at launch or, in case of the International Space Station, supplies are regularly launched from Earth on several different types of unmanned cargo ferries.

Spacecraft are also equipped with air purification systems that use lithium hydroxide to prevent dangerous levels of carbon monoxide and dioxide from building up. If these systems aren’t functioning (do any of you remember Apollo 13’s dilemma of square peg and round hole?), the crew will lapse into unconsciousness and die.

Water is a byproduct of the fuel cells used to generate energy — they create H2O by the electrolysis process; hydrogen and oxygen stored in tanks are combined to generate power and clean water for drinking.

Trash is disposed of by dumping it overboard or loading it into those unmanned ferries, which burn up on reentry.

All of this is very resource-intensive. Even the Naaru likely face shortcomings of supply levels that can be stored on board even in an optimal situation (plenty of time to renew supply levels on the most-recently-visited world), and a ship travelling through space must carry everything it needs with it; interstellar space, while not truly empty, contains little that can be used to directly sustain life.

Enter the idea of stasis. Stasis slows the body’s rhythms: heartbeat, respiration, brain function, metabolism. A body in stasis consumes less oxygen (or whatever gas that life form requires), exhales less waste, requires fewer nutrients, and creates less waste. By placing as many people as possible in stasis during the trip, a crew can ensure that available supplies will last longer.

And finally, there’s the problem of keeping the mind busy. Studies have been ongoing for years; the United States and the Soviet Union/Russia have both experimented with isolating several people together in order to simulate the years-long round trip to Mars and back to Earth. Results have varied, but boredom is a factor, and it will be necessary for entertainment to be accomodated during long voyages. What kind of items would be carried? Would there be enough?

In real life we don’t know how to put people into stasis yet, although research on that is ongoing as well. But when considering the challenges of very-long-term space travel, if the technology is available it is just about a necessity to use it.

A small maintenance crew would be kept awake to monitor the stasis systems, help to navigate the ship, and repair any failures that might occur. This crew would be rotated so that any one individual would not be awake and bored for too long.

the thing, better explained because I’m worse at explaining things that involve technology 

Reblogging this, because while it’s about Draenei, a lot of the space faring stuff is super relevant to WildStar too!

Reblogged from asynchronist  1,458 notes

asynchronist:

Playing with privilege: the invisible benefits of gaming while male

shycustis:

radicalbytes:

I wrote an article attempting to identify some of the unearned benefits and privileges my fellow male gamers and I are afforded simply by virtue of being male. Please check out the full article in context over on Polygon.

  1. I can choose to remain completely oblivious, or indifferent to the harassment that many women face in gaming spaces.
  2. I am never told that video games or the surrounding culture is not intended for me because I am male.
  3. I can publicly post my username, gamertag or contact information online without having to fear being stalked or sexually harassed because of my gender.
  4. I will never be asked to “prove my gaming cred” simply because of my gender.
  5. If I enthusiastically express my fondness for video games no one will automatically assume I’m faking my interest just to “get attention” from other gamers.
  6. I can look at practically any gaming review site, show, blog or magazine and see the voices of people of my own gender widely represented.
  7. When I go to a gaming event or convention, I can be relatively certain that I won’t be harassed, groped, propositioned or catcalled by total strangers.
  8. I will never be asked or expected to speak for all other gamers who share my gender.
  9. I can be sure that my gaming performance (good or bad) won’t be attributed to or reflect on my gender as a whole.
  10. My gaming ability, attitude, feelings or capability will never be called into question based on unrelated natural biological functions.
  11. I can be relatively sure my thoughts about video games won’t be dismissed or attacked based solely on my tone of voice, even if I speak in an aggressive, obnoxious, crude or flippant manner.
  12. I can openly say that my favorite games are casual, odd, non-violent, artistic, or cute without fear that my opinions will reinforce a stereotype that “men are not real gamers.”
  13. When purchasing most major video games in a store, chances are I will not be asked if (or assumed to be) buying it for a wife, daughter or girlfriend.
  14. The vast majority of game studios, past and present, have been led and populated primarily by people of my own gender and as such most of their products have been specifically designed to cater to my demographic.
  15. I can walk into any gaming store and see images of my gender widely represented as powerful heroes, villains and non-playable characters alike.
  16. I will almost always have the option to play a character of my gender, as most protagonists or heroes will be male by default.
  17. I do not have to carefully navigate my engagement with online communities or gaming spaces in order to avoid or mitigate the possibility of being harassed because of my gender.
  18. I probably never think about hiding my real-life gender online through my gamer-name, my avatar choice, or by muting voice-chat, out of fear of harassment resulting from my being male.
  19. When I enter an online game, I can be relatively sure I won’t be attacked or harassed when and if my real-life gender is made public
  20. If I am trash-talked or verbally berated while playing online, it will not be because I am male nor will my gender be invoked as an insult.
  21. While playing online with people I don’t know I won’t be interrogated about the size and shape of my real-life body parts, nor will I be pressured to share intimate details about my sex life for the pleasure of other players.
  22. Complete strangers generally do not send me unsolicited images of their genitalia or demand to see me naked on the basis of being a male gamer.
  23. In multiplayer games I can be pretty sure that conversations between other players will not focus on speculation about my “attractiveness” or “sexual availability” in real-life.
  24. If I choose to point out sexism in gaming, my observations will not be seen as self-serving, and will therefore be perceived as more credible and worthy of respect than those of my female counterparts, even if they are saying the exact same thing.
  25. Because it was created by a straight white male, this checklist will likely be taken more seriously than if it had been written by virtually any female gamer.

image

IMPORTANT, NON-ART POST TIME.

This list hits so close to home. Every point’s a gut-punch reminder of mistreatment I and so many friends have endured. The final plunge from insult into disgust is #25; not disgust at the article or radicalbytes, but at how true it is.

I’m forward enough that I don’t get as much of the in-your-face sexist pushback I used to, but it’s been replaced by much more subtle acts of bias that are no less venomous. Sexism permeates the gaming community (and industry) so fundamentally women don’t have to be harassed or blatantly insulted to experience being the unwelcome company, being othered.

Very often, men will disregard me when talking about games. They focus on my husband, Coey, and any input from me is quickly dismissed or even ignored entirely. He has blatantly attempted to include me in conversations many times, even swing conversations over to me when the topic is more my area-of-expertise/genre/series, but it rarely sticks. This happens at conventions, gaming stores, plainly in public, even with people considered friends. At cons, we’ve had many be drawn to our booth by a piece of gaming fanart I made, but then I’m typically left out of the conversation I initiated. People assume the fanart must be my husband’s. When I reveal it’s mine, they’re surprised and even lose interest all together. Coey’s had people fawn over his gaming tattoos, but when he mentions [insert gaming tattoo I have that’s relevant to their convo] they have no interest. One of the most insulting parts is the marked difference of our treatment before and after he transitioned. Before he started identifying and passing as male, we were both regarded identically in these situations.

Those who do include me seem insistent on noting of how “special” I am. Remarks toward Coey’s on how lucky he is to have a wife who games. Surprised comments about how not many “girls” like [insert game series/genre/etc]. They’ll humour my opinions and comments on the community/industry, but take them with a grain of salt. Rarely is real effort or care put into considering what I have to say, until Coey backs me up.
I’ve been treated and received as one of the exceptions, in which I take no pride.

My experiences aren’t unique in the slightest.

Reblogged from mvmarcz  51,040 notes
m45c:

fuckyourracism:

sugoi-rudeboi:

jelizabeth41:

lyriciss:

petitfemmenoir:

THIS IS NOT NEWS

I don’t know what people expect Egyptians to be. I guess watching The 10 Commandments on ABC growing up got folks thinking they all looked like bronzed white people.

👆👆👆👆👆

BREAKING NEWS: BLACK PEOPLE ARE BLACK. THIS IS AN AMAZING DISCOVERY. BLACK PEOPLE EXISTED BEFORE WE DISCOVERED THEM AND ENSLAVED THEM AND FUCKED UP THEIR LAND. WOW.

Africans in Africa? Mind blown. 

Yaaaassss Khia

m45c:

fuckyourracism:

sugoi-rudeboi:

jelizabeth41:

lyriciss:

petitfemmenoir:

THIS IS NOT NEWS

I don’t know what people expect Egyptians to be. I guess watching The 10 Commandments on ABC growing up got folks thinking they all looked like bronzed white people.

👆👆👆👆👆

BREAKING NEWS: BLACK PEOPLE ARE BLACK. THIS IS AN AMAZING DISCOVERY. BLACK PEOPLE EXISTED BEFORE WE DISCOVERED THEM AND ENSLAVED THEM AND FUCKED UP THEIR LAND. WOW.

Africans in Africa? Mind blown. 

Yaaaassss Khia

Reblogged from reyairia  144 notes
kepral:

bioware-confessions:


[x]

Everyone seems so worried about Samara’s boobs, Traynor’s lingerie and Shepard’s dress because it’s all sooo sexist and gross etc etc but why nobody talks about Jack? She’s almost naked damn it. Personally I feel quite uncomfortable about it.

Jack’s attire is reminiscent of how she would dress, they could have given her clothes but I think the main reason they picked this design is to show off her tattoos which comes up in conversation often enough, as well as her scars. She literally wears her heart on her sleeve, and not only that, unlike any other clothing which (normally does not suit the character’s personality) her topless-ness is surprisingly not sexual. 
Look at Miranda, she is FULLY CLOTHED she does not even have a plunging neckline, though there’s some physics not working on her butt’s wedgie but she is fully dressed in a way that is meant to be sexy, its tight and showing off all her curves. Jack has boobs and curves but that’s not what’s high-lighted in her costume, her breasts are even compressed to look smaller (like a topless binder), unlike say.. the Desire demons in Dragon Age which wear as much as Jack but are sexualized.
Jack’s toplessness isn’t ‘look at my boobies you could probably touch them’ its ‘I don’t give a fuck about clothes or if you look, but see these tattoos and scars? yeah i’ll fuck you up if you touch me without my consent’ 

[ex: personally I think they should have gone with the middle one as it has the same bad-ass attitude and shows tattoos but doesn’t show her naked]
Her concept art was more clothed, and personally I like them, but as I said the only reason to pick her final is that her scars and tattoos were part of conversations and show her character, her nakedness is fitting of her character. 
However a lot of her art concepts have more sexualized costumes.

[ex: 1,2,3,4,5,: are more sexualized than her final even though they have more clothes]

[ex: 2,3,4,5,: are more sexualized than her final even though they have more clothes]
It’s a fashion thing, you can be fully clothed and be more sexualized by a naked person. 

kepral:

bioware-confessions:

[x]

Everyone seems so worried about Samara’s boobs, Traynor’s lingerie and Shepard’s dress because it’s all sooo sexist and gross etc etc but why nobody talks about Jack? She’s almost naked damn it. Personally I feel quite uncomfortable about it.

Jack’s attire is reminiscent of how she would dress, they could have given her clothes but I think the main reason they picked this design is to show off her tattoos which comes up in conversation often enough, as well as her scars. She literally wears her heart on her sleeve, and not only that, unlike any other clothing which (normally does not suit the character’s personality) her topless-ness is surprisingly not sexual. 

Look at Miranda, she is FULLY CLOTHED she does not even have a plunging neckline, though there’s some physics not working on her butt’s wedgie but she is fully dressed in a way that is meant to be sexy, its tight and showing off all her curves. Jack has boobs and curves but that’s not what’s high-lighted in her costume, her breasts are even compressed to look smaller (like a topless binder), unlike say.. the Desire demons in Dragon Age which wear as much as Jack but are sexualized.

Jack’s toplessness isn’t ‘look at my boobies you could probably touch them’ its ‘I don’t give a fuck about clothes or if you look, but see these tattoos and scars? yeah i’ll fuck you up if you touch me without my consent’ 

[ex: personally I think they should have gone with the middle one as it has the same bad-ass attitude and shows tattoos but doesn’t show her naked]

Her concept art was more clothed, and personally I like them, but as I said the only reason to pick her final is that her scars and tattoos were part of conversations and show her character, her nakedness is fitting of her character. 

However a lot of her art concepts have more sexualized costumes.

[ex: 1,2,3,4,5,: are more sexualized than her final even though they have more clothes]

[ex: 2,3,4,5,: are more sexualized than her final even though they have more clothes]

It’s a fashion thing, you can be fully clothed and be more sexualized by a naked person.